Menstruation

‘Non Urgent’ NIH Study Investigating Potential Impact of ‘Vaccines’ on Women’s Periods to Include Transgenders Taking Male hormones

I’ve written previously with regard to the large number of women reporting quite drastic changes to their periods following administration of the Covid ‘vaccines’. It appears to be quite a significant problem, which, considering the close link between menstruation and fertility and women’s overall health in general, is worthy, in my opinion, of urgent further investigation; nay, actually it was worthy of urgent investigation before they just dished out these ‘vaccines’ to healthy young women, even pregnant women, who are at little risk of severe Covid symptoms. So what do we get from the US National Institute of Health? A ‘non urgent’ investigation which bizarrely includes female to male transgender individuals who are taking large doses of male hormones!

The National Institutes of Health has announced a $1.67 million study to investigate reports that suggest the COVID-19 vaccine may come with an unexpected impact on reproductive health.

It’s been a little over six months since the three COVID-19 vaccines in the US — Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson — became widely available to all adults. But even in the early days of vaccine rollout, some women were noticing irregular periods following their shots, as reported first by the Lily in April.

Shana Clauson, 45, spoke to the Washington Post’s women’s news site at the time, and again this week, about her experience after getting the jab — revealing that her period arrived earlier and heavier than what she considers normal. She was one of many who gathered on social media to share what they were seeing.

“Is this not being discussed, or is it even being looked at or researched because it’s a ‘woman’s issue?’ ” Clauson speculated to the Lily last spring.

It would appear that the NIH heard Clauson and others’ reports, as they announced on Aug. 30 that they intended to embark on just such research — aiming to incorporate up to half a million participants, including teens and transgender and nonbinary people.

Researchers at Boston University, Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Michigan State University and Oregon Health and Science University have been enlisted to embark on the study, commissioned by the NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the Office of Research on Women’s Health.

That’s big of them isn’t it? They’re even going to include transgender and non binary ‘people’ as well as politically incorrect to mention women. So inclusive of them.

The approximately yearlong study will follow initially unvaccinated participants to observe changes that occur following each dose. More specifically, some groups will exclude participants on birth control or gender-affirming hormones, which may have their own impact on periods.

Some groups? Why not all groups? Does it not seem fairly obvious that if you want to investigate the possible influence of the ‘vaccines’ only on the menstrual cycles of women, then you include only normally menstruating, healthy women, not those taking contraceptive pills, and certainly not those receiving massive doses of male hormones as part of gender reassigment, both of which can seriously affect periods? These will only serve to cloud the results. You don’t need these groups at all. But, but, diversity, inclusion! Would it surprise me in the least if, in deference to the rainbow-hued God of Diversity, they also included male to female transgenders who don’t menstruate at all on account of the fact that they don’t have ovaries or a uterus? No, it would not! They would argue in that case that the ‘vaccines’ had no effect whatsoever on the menstrual cycles of these women! Science, innit?

The Mail reports:

Now, the federal health agency has distributed one-year supplemental grants totaling $1.67 million to Boston University, Harvard Medical School, Johns Hopkins University, Michigan State University and Oregon Health and Science University. 

The five studies will likely recruit between 400,000 and 500,000 participants, including adolescents, transgender women and nonbinary people, Dr Diana Bianchi, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, told The Washington Post.  

So it looks like different universities will study different groups of ‘menstruating people’, in the words of Bianchi.

It just gets worse:

“Our goal is to provide menstruating people with information, mainly as to what to expect, because I think that was the biggest issue: Nobody expected it to affect the menstrual system, because the information wasn’t being collected in the early vaccine studies,” said NICHD director Diana Bianchi in a statement to the Lily — reportedly crediting their early coverage for helping to make the NIH aware.

‘Nobody expected’? Is that their justification for doing a post hoc study after administering these ‘vaccines’ to millions of unsuspecting women assured at the time that they were ‘safe and effective’. Bloody hell! This is what now passes for ‘science’ and medical ethics? And ‘menstruating people’? What is so wrong with saying women? Biological women are the only human beings on the planet who menstruate and the concern should be solely with normal, healthy menstruating and recently menopausal women (yes, there have also been reports of post menopausal women experiencing periods!), not subjects who will likely be experiencing significant interruptions to their periods due to other (totally unrelated) issues.

But it gets even worse than that. The NIH boldly claims (without evidence) that the ‘vaccines’ do not affect fertility and that investigating their potential effect upon menstruation is hardly a “life and death” issue! Say what? If an unborn child dies in the womb, then I think that is a life or death issue, don’t you? For the child certainly, but also potentially for the grieving mother.

It’s also worth noting the vaccine does not cause infertility and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the shot even for pregnant women.

As changes to the menstrual cycle are “really not a life and death issue,” explained Bianchi, the Food and Drug Administration — fast-tracking their work — prioritized only the most critical risks associated with the COVID-19 vaccine.

Then Bianchi pulls the cat out of the bag, giving away the real reason why they have grudgingly and belatedly, ‘rushed through’ what is essentially a ‘non-urgent’ study into the effects of the experimental ‘vaccines’ on a key indicator of the reproductive health of women:

The NIH, too, pulled together the initiative at breakneck speed. Funding for such a study would typically take years to see approval.

“We were worried this was contributing to vaccine hesitancy in reproductive-age women,” said Bianchi.

Sickening. And misogynistic.